Review of Telesurf broadband plans

Telesurf is a relatively new broadband and phone service provider based out of Sydney. Launched in 2015, Telesurf is owned by Pon Project Services – a company with over 30 years industry experience. Telesurf offers a range of both ADSL2+ and NBN plans. Additionally, it offers a range of home security packages that are optional when choosing your broadband plan. This security is subsequently run off your broadband connection. Beyond that, let’s see what Telesurf has to offer in more detail, and how it stacks up compared to other providers.

What broadband plans does Telesurf offer?

Telesurf offers broadband and home phone bundles with refreshing transparency about what you can expect to pay. Overall there is only one plan for ADSL2+ connections, with a few for NBN and Naked DSL connections. Costs then differ depending on if you bundle your broadband plan with a home phone plan, or any home security features.

Telesurf ADSL2+

Telesurf comes to play with one base plan: $44.95 a month for one terabyte (TB) of data. Telesurf claims speeds of 20Mbps/1Mbps download/upload with this plan. It features shaped data, which means should you exceed your data limit you’ll be on throttled speeds.

  • It has a set-up fee of $190
  • The Tele Talk plan costs $32.35 a month with a $70 set-up fee
  • National calls are billed at 9c a minute, while mobiles are 28c a minute, with a 22c flagfall each call
  • An optional home security system is available from an extra $25 a month, with a range of security add-ons from about $50
  • Fibre phone is available from $9.95 a month with some optional extras also available

So, by the time you ‘max out’ your plan, you could be facing monthly charges exceeding $100 a month. $44.95 is the base plan, and it can very easily exceed that amount with some add-ons.

Telesurf Naked DSL

If you’re solely after no-frills naked broadband then Telesurf’s Naked DSL could be up your alley. There are two key plans:

  • 100GB data for $49.95 a month
  • 300GB data for $59.95 a month

Download speeds are claimed at 20Mbps, and uploads at 0.8Mbps. Data is again shaped. Further to this you can add on a home security package for $25 a month and additional add-ons can be had from about $50. Fibre phone can also be had from $9.95 a month. Naked DSL is a great opportunity for those not requiring a home phone line, and can work out to be more cost effective than traditional ADSL2+.

Telesurf NBN

Telesurf also has a range of NBN plans across all consumer speed tiers. You can choose from two base plans:

  • 200GB from $45 a month
  • 1TB from $59 a month

A jump to the next speed tier increases the monthly cost by $10. You can expect a Tier 5 1TB plan to cost $89 a month. Beyond these base plans, you can choose an NBN modem for about $110, with the usual option for a home security package and related add-ons.

How does Telesurf broadband compare to other providers?

Telesurf has a range of straightforward plan structures that makes it pretty easy to compare to other providers. While its base plans compare pretty well to the competition, it’s not until you add on other things like home phones and home security services that the costs start to add up.

ADSL2+ Plans Compared

Telesurf’s only plan meets some serious competition. It competes with the likes of Dodo, Inspired Broadband, AusBBS and Barefoot, which all offer unlimited data – instead of 1TB – for comparable or cheaper prices. Like Telesurf, these providers provide month to month contracts, however phone line rental can also send costs to skyrocket. For example, Telesurf’s phone plan will cost a minimum of about $800 over 24 months, and calls are not included in this figure.

Naked DSL Plans Compared

If the premise of a home phone is turning you off then consider naked DSL. You won’t pay for line rental, but some plans do still provide VoIP services, which is calling over the internet. Prices are a little more expensive month to month with naked DSL but not having to pay for a landline can be beneficial. With Telesurf you are locked into a 24 month contract. Here, providers like MyNetFone, MyRepublic, iiNet and Internode all offer unlimited data for comparable prices as Telesurf. Some even are on no contract terms!

NBN Plans Compared

At the most basic end of the NBN spectrum, Telesurf offers some pretty cheap-looking plans, with 200GB for only $45 a month on Tier 1. While Telesurf offers a lofty 1TB of data, other providers offer unlimited data for comparable prices. SpinTel, Exetel, AusBBS and Inspired all offer unlimited data on Tier 1 for slightly cheaper monthly prices. You’ll also have to consider these plans are on a no contract basis, whereas Telesurf’s is on a 12 month one.

If you desire some faster NBN, Tier 5 produces the goods. This end of the speed scale cannot exactly be described as ‘cheap’, but Telesurf comes to the game with its plan for about a reasonable $90 a month. Again, familiar faces like MyRepublic, AusBBS and Exetel dominate the ranks as some of the cheapest NBN providers. However, MyRepublic is by far and away the cheapest, blowing others out of the water by over $20 a month.

Is Telesurf broadband a good move?

Telesurf offers some pretty interesting bundles. Bundling internet and a home phone plan with home security is seldom seen by other providers, but it makes sense really. However, these bundles can add up in costs quickly, and you could easily see yourself spending over $100 a month with these frills for a base plan that can be had with other providers for a lot cheaper.

Telesurf gets stuck in the trap of providing 1TB of data with its plans, instead of unlimited. While 1TB is a lot of data, unlimited is the new benchmark these days. Furthermore, while Telesurf’s base plans seem to be pretty solid value, there are other providers out there that can offer more data for less money. It’s worth comparing a range of different service providers to see who offers you the best value, but who knows – maybe Telesurf’s home security system bundled with phone and internet is what you’re after.

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