Superloop vs Telstra: NBN Plans Compared

Telstra is one of Australia’s most popular telcos and internet providers, servicing homes all over the country. With a decades-long reputation, Telstra is easily able to stand its ground against its competitors, despite not being the cheapest provider on offer. So with that in mind, how might it compare to a relative newcomer in the NBN market?

Superloop is one of the newer internet providers on the block, having started operation two years ago. The service offers a range of speeds, including newly-introduced ultra-fast speed tiers which are not yet available from most providers.

There’s a lot of differences between Superloop and Telstra, but which NBN provider is right for you? Below we’ve outlined the stark differences between the telcos, so you can make the right choice for your household.

Superloop vs Telstra: Plans compared

The table below shows plans offered by Superloop and Telstra, which are generally available to most NBN capable households (to the exception of Telstra’s NBN 100 plan, which is only serviceable to select NBN technology types such as Fibre to the Premises and HFC). If you’re interested in the ultrafast speeds on offer from both providers, consider scrolling below the table.

The following table includes a selection of published Superloop and Telstra NBN plans on Canstar Blue’s database, listed in order of standard monthly cost, from the lowest to highest, and then by alphabetical order of provider. Use our comparison tool above to see plans from a range of providers. This is a selection of products with links to a referral partner.

Superloop vs Telstra: Plan features, savings and speeds

Both providers offer the same NBN speeds, although have completely different approaches to how plans are packaged. While Superloop focuses on high speeds, stripping away any add-ons like phones or entertainment packs, Telstra has a service that covers all bases of your home needs, including call packs and entertainment bundles.

Telstra and Superloop are each among a handful of ISPs in Australia to offer typical evening average speeds that match the maximum potential speed of each tier (for example, 50Mbps for NBN 50), so you don’t necessarily need to sacrifice fast performance by going for a cheaper plan. Telstra is more a jack of all trades ISP, versus an ISP that prioritises speed.

Contracts

Superloop and Telstra both offer plans without any lock-in contracts. However, with Telstra, if you sign up on a modem-bundled plan, you’ll have to stay connected for 24 months if you want to avoid paying for your hardware. As far as the actual internet plans go, no lock-ins apply – just make sure you browse the critical information summary on your selected plan, so you’re not caught off-guard by any potential fees or charges.

Modems

Both providers offer modems, with Superloop’s starting at $99.95 for a WiFi Router (works with FTTP, HFC and FTTC connections) and $124.95 for a VDSL2 WiFi Modem Router (works with FTTN and FTTB), plus a $14.95 shipping fee.

Telstra’s Smart Modem is included on all plans. Normally priced at $216, Telstra will waive this fee if you stay connected for the full 24 months; if you cancel earlier, you’ll need to pay out the remaining cost of the device. Telstra’s modem also comes with a 4G backup in the event your NBN connection drops out.

Bundles

If you’re after perks, you may be let down by Superloop’s offering. This ISP doesn’t offer any entertainment extras or call packs, whereas Telstra provides a range of both included and add-on extras.

Telstra offers unlimited local, national and Australian mobile calls on every plan, and customers can also add Telstra TV access for an additional $9 per month, over 24 months. You can also add Foxtel to your plan, with packages starting from $ 140 per month for both NBN and TV channels.

Superfast speeds

Both providers offer NBN 250 and NBN 1000 plans, but you’ll need to be on a FTTP or selected HFC connection to access these speeds. If you’re after a superfast speed, it might be worth comparing these providers.

Superloop and Telstra NBN 25 plans

The slowest speed plans you can get from Superloop and Telstra are on the NBN 25 speed tier, each with unlimited monthly data. NBN 25 is a decent place to start if you’re a casual internet user who’s not looking to spend lots of money: this tier works fine for online gaming, standard-definition video streaming and basic web browsing. It’s perfect for a small, one-to-three person household.

Superloop and Telstra NBN 50 plans

The mid-range plan offered by both providers is NBN 50, with Superloop and Telstra each including unlimited data. With double the download speed of NBN 25, and five times the upload speed, you’ll find NBN 50 is best for three-to-four person households who like to stream, play games online, and download content quickly.

Superloop and Telstra NBN 100 plans

NBN 100 is the speed tier for internet enthusiasts and big downloaders. 4K streaming is easy on this speed tier with quick loading times, and this speed is perfect for a competitive online gamer who hates update speeds and lag. Most plans from providers will offer this speed tier with 20Mbps upload speeds, however Superloop also gives you the option of a 40Mbps maximum upload speed. NBN 100 is perfect for households of four to six people.

Superloop and Telstra NBN 250 and NBN 1000 plans

Superloop and Telstra are some of the only providers that offer NBN 250 and NBN 1000 plans. These speeds are not available to most customers, being limited to FTTP households and some HFC homes – you’ll need to check with your internet provider to see if you’re eligible.

NBN 250 is faster than NBN 100, and could be perfect for you if you need a high-speed internet connection (say if you’re a competitive gamer or live in a sharehouse). NBN 1000 is even faster, capable of massive file size downloads in a matter of minutes and online gaming without any hassles.

Again, these speed tiers might be best for a sharehouse or a large family. Also keep in mind both of these plans are much more expensive than typical NBN plans.

The following table shows a selection of published Superloop plans on Canstar Blue’s database, listed in order of their standard monthly cost, from lowest to highest. Use our comparison tool to see plans from a range of other providers. This is a selection of products with links to a referral partner.

Brand Features Max Data**/billing period Advertised Cost^^/billing period
Superloop logo

Unlimited Superfast 250/25

  • Superfast 250/25 Speed (NBN 250)
  • BYO modem

min. cost $119.95 over one month

UnlimitedMax Data**/billing period $119.95Advertised Cost^^/billing period Go To Site
View all NBN plans listed on Canstar Blue

Telstra Superfast & Ultrafast NBN Plans

The following table shows a selection of published Telstra NBN 250 and NBN 1000 plans on Canstar Blue’s database, listed in order of their standard monthly cost, from the lowest to highest. Use our comparison tool to see plans from a range of other providers. This is a selection of products with links to a referral partner.

Brand Features Max Data**/billing period Advertised Cost^^/billing period
Telstra Logo

Superfast NBN

  • Superfast Speed (NBN 250)
  • Typical evening speed: 215Mbps
  • $216 modem (free when you stay connected for 24 months)
  • Special offer: $99 connection fee waived (online only)
  • Special offer: 3 months free BINGE Standard. Offer available until withdrawn.
  • Unlimited local, national & mobile calls included

min. cost $3,459 over 24 months

UnlimitedMax Data**/billing period $140Advertised Cost^^/billing period Go To Site
Telstra Logo

Ultrafast NBN

  • Ultrafast Speed (NBN 1000)
  • Typical evening speed: 250Mbps
  • $216 modem (free when you stay connected for 24 months)
  • Special offer: $99 connection fee waived (online only)
  • Special offer: 3 months free BINGE Standard. Offer available until withdrawn.
  • Unlimited local, national & mobile calls included

min. cost $4,419 over 24 months

UnlimitedMax Data**/billing period $180Advertised Cost^^/billing period Go To Site
View all NBN plans listed on Canstar Blue

Superloop vs Telstra: NBN speeds

Each provider lists a different ‘typical evening speed’ available on their plans. This is made up of the average observed download speed achieved by customers during the peak usage hours of 7pm and 11pm. This is a decent indication of real-world speeds you could achieve on your plan, but do keep in mind that your speed can vary due to your connection type, your local network traffic, and other factors.

Typical Evening Speeds for Superloop

  • NBN 25 — 22Mbps Typical Evening Speed
  • NBN 50 — 50Mbps Typical Evening Speed
  • NBN 100/20 — 96Mbps Typical Evening Speed
  • NBN 100/40 — 96Mbps Typical Evening Speed
  • NBN 250/25 — 240Mbps Typical Evening Speed
  • NBN 1000/50 — 500Mbps Typical Evening Speed
Correct as of September 2021

Typical Evening Speeds for Telstra

  • NBN 25 — 25Mbps Typical Evening Speed
  • NBN 50 — 50Mbps Typical Evening Speed
  • NBN 100/20 — 100Mbps Typical Evening Speed
  • NBN 250/25 — 230Mbps Typical Evening Speed
  • NBN 1000/50 — 700Mbps Typical Evening Speed
Correct as of August 2021

Which provider should I go with?

Simply put, Telstra is more expensive on every plan, but for that you’ll get access to extra and perks, plus bundled-in calls. Superloop on the other hand is on the value side of things, offering cheaper NBN prices than Telstra, with all of the extras stripped away but with comparable evening speeds.

Both providers offer Australian-based support, plans without lock-in contracts, and have modems available. Telstra and Superloop both cater to broadband enthusiasts, but there’s lots for a casual user to love in each provider’s plans.

It all boils down to what you’re willing to spend, and what’s available where you live. If you’re still unsure about the decision, you can use our free NBN comparison tool to compare providers from our database.

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