Energy Plans with Solar

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Thousands of Australian households are switching to solar every year. Since solar panels aren’t exactly cheap, it’s important that you’re maximising the return on your investment with a solar plan suited for your needs. For some, especially first-time solar installers, navigating the world of feed-in tariffs and tracking exports can be tricky, especially without a reference point of what’s considered a ‘good deal’. We’re here to iron out the basics and leave you with a few options for competitively priced energy plans with solar.

What to look for in a solar energy plan

Solar panel question mark

Solar energy plans don’t come in one-size-fits-all. You’re best off choosing a power plan that complements your system and usage requirements. Here are some general recommendations for what sort of energy deal may suit your system and household needs depending on how much juice you get out of your solar panels and how you use energy during the day.

  • Your solar panels help with some of your daytime power usage: If your solar panels are only taking care of some of your daytime electricity use, you’ll still be relying heavily on the grid to power your home. In this case, a plan with a good feed-in tariff is a bit less important, simply because you won’t be exporting much, if any, power. Therefore, you’ll want a plan with low electricity usage charges so you’re paying for power from the grid at a fair price. Use our comparison tool to find a comparatively cheap deal in your area.
  • You can rely on your solar panels for the whole day: For solar panels that can be relied on throughout a regular day, but without any battery storage, you’ll only be using power from the grid at night. For this reason, it’s important to find a plan with good usage and supply rates, and less important to look for a really high feed-in tariff plan with higher rates.
  • Your solar panels generate more than the energy you use in a day: If your power usage is regularly less than what your solar panels produce, your solar panels will start exporting into the grid. A plan with a decent solar feed-in tariff, but still competitive rates, could be a good idea if this sounds like your household.
  • You have solar panels with battery storage: Homes with solar storage have the least reliance on the electricity grid, but are also not exporting into the grid unless the battery is fully charged. So, it’s still important to have a reasonable feed-in tariff, though in most cases, a plan that’s competitive should be the most price-effective for when your storage system runs dry.

Energy plans with solar in Australia

Most energy plans on the market will provide a feed-in tariff for solar panel owners, even if it’s just the state minimum. In addition to this, there are plans that are specifically marketed towards customers with solar, oftentimes coming with higher feed-in tariff than what’s available with the provider’s other offers.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on the Ausgrid network in Sydney but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 3900kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. This table may include products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on the Citipower network in Melbourne but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 4000kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. This table may include products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on the Energex network in Brisbane but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 4600kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. This table may include products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on SA Power network in Adelaide but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 4000kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. This table may include products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Are solar-specific plans worth it?

A solar specific plan could certainly be a good option for households searching for a deal with a higher feed-in tariff than normal electricity plans. However, with so much of energy retail coming down to marketing, don’t be fooled into thinking that all of these solar-specific plans come with a generous export rate. Where a solar feed-in tariff does seem high, it’s also important to check that the plan’s basic rates aren’t higher than market competitive or standard, as your usage at night time will still make up a good portion of your bill.

Energy plans with high solar feed-in tariffs

If a good solar feed-in tariff is what you’re looking for, here at Canstar Blue we list some of the highest feed-in tariffs available to households across New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, and South Australia, according to our database in April 2020.

Highest feed-in tariff plans NSW

  1. 23c/kWh (Origin Solar Boost Plus) Must sign-up to solar with Origin
  2. 17c/kWh (AGL Solar Savers)
  3. 16c/kWh (Energy Locals Local Saver)

Highest feed-in tariff plans VIC

  1. 16c/kWh (Origin Solar Boost)
  2. 13.5c/kWh (Momentum Energy Solar Step-Up)
  3. 13c/kWh (Amaysim Electricity Subscription)

Highest feed-in tariff plans QLD

  1. 19c/kWh (Origin Solar Boost Plus) Must sign-up to solar with Origin
  2. 15c/kWh (AGL Solar Savers)
  3. 16c/kWh (Energy Locals Local Saver)

Highest feed-in tariff plans SA

  1. 23c/kWh (Origin Solar Boost Plus) Must sign-up to solar with Origin
  2. 22c/kWh (Amaysim Electricity Subscription)
  3. 16c/kWh (AGL Solar Savers)

For a more comprehensive, up-to-date list, visit our solar feed-in tariff information page.

Other energy plans with solar feed-in tariffs

To give due merit, it’s essential to remember that especially for households with smaller sized solar systems, a plan with low usage and supply rates could be a better fit than one with simply a high feed-in tariff. If you’re new to the solar power game, it won’t be long before you see how much your solar panels are earning you for exporting power, and how much power your household still needs from the grid.

If you’re finding that your usage far outweighs your exports, it might be a good idea to choose a competitive plan, granted that retailer accepts solar customers. Click on your state below to see some of the cheapest deals in your area.

Image credits: Adam Calaitzis/shutterstock.com, alexmillos/shutterstock.com

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