Mayonnaise Reviews

Canstar Blue’s first-ever mayonnaise review has seen Colway (ALDI), Kewpie, Thomy, Best Foods, Praise, S&W, Heinz, Hellmann’s, Coles and Woolworths compared on their taste, texture & consistency, range variety, packaging design, value for money and overall satisfaction.

See our Ratings Methodology.

Most Satisfied Customers | Colway (ALDI)

Colway (ALDI) was rated cream of the crop in Canstar Blue’s mayonnaise ratings, scoring five stars for packaging design, value for money and overall satisfaction.

Colway (ALDI) spreads a win in mayo ratings

Any leftover cabbage can and will be shredded and mixed with mayonnaise. It’s Cole’s Law. Get it?? Bad puns aside, most of our favourite meals would be nothing without ‘mayo’. Think tuna melts, sushi, coleslaw (obviously), deviled eggs, fish and chips and the list goes on. So, it’s no surprise that over a third of Aussies we surveyed (38%) buy mayonnaise as part of their regular grocery shop. But, with so many flavours and brands available on the shelves, how do you know which mayo is worth your butter?

We can help you there. Canstar Blue has surveyed more than 1,600 everyday consumers like yourself, for their feedback on the mayonnaise brands they have purchased and consumed in the last three months. Respondents rated respective brands on important factors such as the taste, texture & consistency, range variety, packaging design, value for money and overall satisfaction. Those which met the minimum required survey sample size of 30 responses are included in the results.

Our inaugural mayo review saw ALDI’s Colway rated best for overall customer satisfaction and other key categories.

Best Mayonnaise Brands

Best mayonnaise reviews

Here are the best mayonnaise brands in Australia, as rated by consumers in Canstar Blue’s first-ever mayo review:

  1. Colway (ALDI)
  2. Kewpie
  3. Thomy
  4. Best Foods
  5. Praise
  6. S&W
  7. Heinz
  8. Hellmann’s
  9. Coles
  10. Woolworths

Colway (ALDI) topped our mayo ratings after earning five-star reviews for its packaging design, value for money and overall customer satisfaction. It was rated four stars for taste, texture and range variety.

Runner-up Kewpie managed to beat ALDI Colway on both taste and texture & consistency, with Thomy also earning five stars for the latter category. Meanwhile, Praise and Heinz also got the edge over our ratings winner on range variety. All in all, most brands finished with a solid four-star rating for overall satisfaction, with the exception of rival supermarket brands Coles and Woolworths which rounded up the results with three stars in most categories.

Read on to find out what each of the brands mentioned have to offer, plus what to think about when buying mayonnaise.

Mayonnaise Brands

Colway (ALDI)

Colway-Mayonnaise

Colway is ALDI’s homebrand of condiments, spanning across salad dressings, sauces (i.e. tomato, seofood etc.) dessert sauces and of course – mayo. There are several flavour options to choose from including Colway’s traditional German-made ‘Real Mayonnaise’, a 97% fat-free light mayo, a gluten-free and soy-free mayonnaise and other specialty flavours like a creamy black pepper mayo, garlic aioli and various limited-edition options from time to time. Most Colway mayo products come in a 466g jar or 470g-500g squeeze bottle and cost as little as $2 at the checkout. If you’re looking for bang for your buck − well folks this is it!

  • Colway (ALDI) was rated five stars on value for money, packaging design and overall satisfaction. It got four stars in the remaining categories including taste, texture and range variety.

Kewpie

Kewpie_Mayonnaise

Kewpie pronounced [kyoo-pee] is a Japanese mayonnaise, the one most commonly found in sushi restaurants. It comes in a soft squeeze bottle with a baby on the front logo. What gives Kewpie mayo its distinctive creamy taste and texture, is in the eggs. Each bottle contains four egg yolks per 500g. The amino acids yielded from the protein of the egg yolk are a key ingredient to the Kewpie flavour, according to the brand. Kewpie’s traditional Japanese-style mayonnaise comes in 300g and 500g packaging, available from most supermarkets and Asian grocers for about $4.70.

  • Kewpie was rated best for taste and It got four stars in the remaining categories, including value for money, range variety, packaging design and overall satisfaction.

Thomy

Thomy_Mayonnaise

Thomy is a Swiss food brand owned by Nestlé, which produces mainly condiments such as mustard, salad dressings, tomato puree, mayonnaise, and cooking oil. It’s also the brand which lays claim to being the first to put mustard in a tube! Thomy’s one and only Delikatess Mayonnaise is claimed to be derived from authentic European recipes, using mostly egg yolk and sunflower oil. It also contains mustard. You can find it in most supermarkets and grocers for $6 for 470g.

  • Thomy earned a five-star rating for texture & consistency, and four stars for packaging design, taste and overall satisfaction. It got three stars for range variety and value for money.

Best Foods

Best_Foods_Mayonnaise

Best Foods is a subsidiary line under the American Hellmann’s brand. Best Foods claims its ‘Real Mayonnaise’ is rich in Omega 3-ALA and is made with cage-free eggs. It’s available in most local supermarkets in jars of 405g for $6 and 810g for $10. If online reviews are anything to go by, this is a great option for sandwiches and cold salads. It’s also boasted for having a slightly better taste than Kraft mayo.

  • Best Foods was rated four stars across the board in our 2020 review, including for taste, texture, value for money and overall satisfaction.

Praise

Praise_Mayonnaise

Praise has been around since the first mayonnaise was launched in Australia back in 1964. Today, the brand offers one of the widest selections of salad dressings, mayonnaise and seafood sauces. Praise’s Traditional Mayo (also available in ‘fat-free’) is said to be made with fresh Australian free-range eggs and to contain no artificial colours or preservatives. Praise also has a ‘Whole Egg’ mayonnaise and various mayo flavours including garlic aioli, beetroot, chipotle and more. Prices for Praise mayo range between $2.50 and $6.

  • Praise was rated five stars for range variety, and four stars everywhere else, including value for money, taste and overall satisfaction.

S&W

SW_Mayonnaise

Founded in 1896 by three Californian grocery wholesalers, S&W is today a brand name synonymous with variety. Its range spans across multiple food staples from canned fruits and vegetables, to cooking oil, fruit juice, mayonnaise and more. For mayo, S&W offers a ‘Real Whole Egg Mayonnaise’, which also comes in a cage-free eggs, gluten-free and ‘light’ option. Most S&W products come in either a squeeze bottle or jar, available in various sizes. This is definitely one of the pricier options on the shelf though, with prices starting from $6 and going up to $9.50 for an 880g jar.

  • S&W was rated three stars for value for money and range variety. It got four stars for taste, texture and overall satisfaction.

Heinz

Heinz_Mayonnaise

Kraft Heinz started in Australia back 1935, initially selling bottled horseradish out of the company’s original site in Richmond, Victoria. Next, came baked beans in tomato sauce, quickly followed by canned spaghetti and the rest is history. Heinz offers a wide selection of traditional and flavoured mayo. The most authentic is the Heinz ‘Seriously Good Mayonnaise’ which is made from 100% cage-free eggs, lemon juice, and carefully selected oil and vinegar. Other flavours in the range include a tartare mayo, a spicy Peri Peri mayo, a Dijon mustard mayo, garlic aioli, a smokey ‘baconnaise’, caramelised onion and more.

  • Heinz was rated five stars for its range variety, and four stars in all other categories, including taste, texture and overall satisfaction.

Hellmann’s

Hellmans_Mayonnaise

Hellmann’s is an American food brand sold all over the world, and under the Best Foods brand in some countries. Hellmann’s is best known for its ‘Real Mayonnaise’, which is supposedly made with ‘real’, simple ingredients including cage-free eggs. It comes in an extra creamy and ‘light’ option also. Hellmann’s range also includes mayonnaise dressings, with different seasonings such as avocado oil, olive oil and so on. Hellmann’s mayo comes in jars and squeeze bottles, with prices starting from $6.

  • Hellmann’s was rated four stars for taste, texture and overall customer satisfaction. It got three stars for value for money, packaging design and range variety.

Coles

Garlic_Mayonnaise_Coles

Coles homebrand is the supermarket’s line of ‘low price’ everyday grocery and household products. Coles’ mayonnaise range includes a few options, from the traditional mayo and whole egg mayo made with free range eggs, to an organic whole egg mayo and even vegan mayonnaise and garlic aioli! There’s also flavoured mayo such as Peri Peri, smokey chipotle, mayo with dill pickle and more. Most of the range is priced under $2.75 too, so whichever flavour you choose, you’re getting a side of bargain with it!

  • Coles was rated four stars for value for money and range variety and three stars in the remaining categories, including overall satisfaction.

Woolworths

Woolworths_Mayonnaise

The Woolworths homebrand mayonnaise range isn’t as extensive as Coles’, although you’ll get the same value for money. Woolies offers squeeze bottle options only, including a traditional mayo for $2.60, a whole egg mayo for $2.55, and a garlic aioli for just $1.55. Woolworths claims its mayo contains no artificial products or preservatives. If you’re looking for a simple, low-cost option for school lunches or meal prep – this is it.

  • Woolworths followed Coles’ trajectory in the ratings, scoring four stars for value for money and range variety and three stars in the remaining categories, including overall satisfaction.

Which mayonnaise should I buy?

mayo-drizzled

Ok, so we know mayo is delicious whether you have it with French fries, in a sanga or cold salad. But, it’s quite high in fat (because it’s made of mostly eggs and vegetable oils) and also contains sugar, which means it can be calorie-dense. It’s no wonder a fifth of respondents to our survey (20%) generally buy a light or fat-free mayonnaise. If you’re watching your waistline, try to also opt for a mayo with organically produced oils, ideally olive or avocado oil.

The next consideration is farmed eggs vs cage-free eggs mayo. There’s virtually no difference in taste, but a cage-free eggs or free range option means the hens from which the eggs are collected are not confined to cages and have access to an outdoor range, which of course is better for animal welfare and the environment.

The rest will ultimately come down to your taste preference. Here are the mayonnaise flavours Aussies in our survey had recently purchased:

  • Traditional: 79%
  • Garlic aioli: 31%
  • Kewpie: 12%
  • Peri Peri: 11%

About the author of this page

Megan Birot

This report was written by Canstar Blue’s Home & Lifestyle Content Lead, Megan Birot. She’s an expert on household appliances, health & beauty products, as well as all things grocery and shopping. When she’s not writing up our research-based ratings reports, Megan spends her time helping consumers make better purchase decisions, whether it’s at the supermarket, other retailers, or online, highlighting the best deals and flagging anything you need to be aware of.

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Picture credits: Africa Studio, Shutterstock.com/ Yuriy Golub, Shutterstock.com.

Frequently Asked Questions

Canstar Blue surveyed more than 3,000 Australian adults across a range of categories to measure and track customer satisfaction, via ISO 26362 accredited research panels managed by Qualtrics. The outcomes reported are the results from customers within the survey group who have purchased and eaten mayonnaise in the last three months – in this case 1,633 people.

Brands must have received at least 30 responses to be included. Results are comparative and it should be noted that brands receiving three stars have still achieved a satisfaction measure of at least six out of 10. Not all brands available in the market have been compared in this survey. The ratings table is first sorted by star ratings and then by mean overall satisfaction. A rated brand may receive a ‘N/A’ (Not Applicable) rating if it does not receive the minimum number of responses for that criteria.

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