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Which energy companies charge paper bill fees?

Fact Checked Fact Checked

If you receive a paper bill from your electricity retailer, you might be paying extra for the privilege. By opting to receive your power bill digitally, you could save paying a paper bill fee, giving you an instant saving off your power bill.

Read on to find out how much you may be paying in paper bill fees, as well as tips on how to avoid this hidden cost.

What are paper bill fees?

Paper bill fees are charges you pay for receiving energy bills in the mail. They are charged by energy companies to cover the cost of printing and posting out customers’ bills, instead of sending them electronically.

Most fees range between $1-$3.30 per bill, which can add up to $39.60 per year if you receive a monthly statement. And if you receive a separate gas bill, you could be paying double that amount in paper bill fees.

I still want paper bills – I just don’t want to pay

The good news is that if you’re a residential energy customer in New South Wales, you won’t be charged for paper bills under state legislation. Residents in other states, including Queensland and Victoria, on standing offers are also exempt. However, if you’re on a standing offer, your higher energy rates are likely to sting you harder than any fees you receive for paper billing.

Customers who are considered vulnerable, such as concession card holders, can also be exempt from paying paper bill fees. If that doesn’t apply to you, the simplest way to avoid paying paper bill fees can be to switch to a provider or plan that doesn’t include the extra charge by default.

Retailers that charge paper bill fees

Here’s a list of retailers in New South Wales, Victoria, south-east Queensland and South Australia that charge paper bill fees to some customers. Note that this charge could be dependent on your location or the specific plan you choose, as some deals only come with email billing.

Retailers that don’t charge paper bill fees

Here’s a list of retailers in Victoria, Queensland, South Australia, the ACT and Tasmania that don’t charge paper bill fees. In many cases, this is because the retailers operate more ‘online only’ business models and their plans are conditional on accepting email billing.

Do paper bill fees differ between states?

If a power provider charges a paper bill fee, it should be a standard cost wherever you live. And, of course, as we mention above, if you live in NSW, you shouldn’t be charged a fee at all. However, before signing up to a paper bill, it’s a good idea to double check with your provider that you won’t be charged extra for the service.

How else can I save on my power bill?

Overall, it’s cheaper for a power company to provide services such as billing options, signing up new customers and customer service online. Therefore, if you’re searching for the cheapest power deals in the market, it could be worthwhile looking for power providers that prioritise their online services.

However, ultimately, the cost of receiving a paper bill is tiny when compared to the cost of a home’s overall energy usage. So if you want to secure the best value electricity plan, start by checking out some of the latest deals below. 

Here are some of the cheapest published deals from the retailers on our database that include a link to the retailer’s website for further details. These are products from referral partners†. These costs are based on the Ausgrid network in Sydney but prices may vary depending on your circumstances. This comparison assumes general energy usage of 3911kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Please use our comparison tool for a specific comparison in your area. Our database may not cover all deals in your area. As always, check all details of any plan directly with the retailer before making a purchase decision.

Here are some of the cheapest published deals from the retailers on our database that include a link to the retailer’s website for further details. These are products from referral partners†. These costs are based on the Citipower network in Melbourne but prices may vary depending on your circumstances. This comparison assumes general energy usage of 4000kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Please use our comparison tool for a specific comparison in your area. Our database may not cover all deals in your area. As always, check all details of any plan directly with the retailer before making a purchase decision.

Here are some of the cheapest published deals from the retailers on our database that include a link to the retailer’s website for further details. These are products from referral partners†. These costs are based on the Energex network in Brisbane but prices may vary depending on your circumstances. This comparison assumes general energy usage of 4613kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Please use our comparison tool for a specific comparison in your area. Our database may not cover all deals in your area. As always, check all details of any plan directly with the retailer before making a purchase decision.

Here are some of the cheapest published deals from the retailers on our database that include a link to the retailer’s website for further details. These are products from referral partners†. These costs are based on the SA Power network in Adelaide but prices may vary depending on your circumstances. This comparison assumes general energy usage of 4011kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Please use our comparison tool for a specific comparison in your area. Our database may not cover all deals in your area. As always, check all details of any plan directly with the retailer before making a purchase decision.

Bruce Pitchers
Content Manager - New Zealand
Bruce Pitchers the Content Manager at Canstar New Zealand. Bruce has three decades’ experience as a journalist and has worked for major media companies in Australia, the UK and New Zealand, including ACP, Are Media, Bauer Media Group, Fairfax, Pacific Magazines, News Corp and TVNZ. Bruce started his career as an entertainment journalist before turning his pen to sport and fitness content, working for some of Australia’s leading sports magazines. Bruce then moved his focus to the world of finance and worked as a freelance writer and editor for The Australian Financial Review, the NZ Financial Markets Authority and major banks and investment companies on both sides of the Tasman. Away from his desk at Canstar, when not standing on the sidelines at his two daughters’ sports games, Bruce spends many hours creating and editing puzzles for magazine and newspaper titles in the USA and Australasia. To that end, he is the co-writer of the murder-mystery puzzle book 5 Minute Murder.

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