500 Watt Solar Panel Systems

There’s plenty of decisions to make when it comes to installing a solar system. There’s questions such as what type of panels should you get, what angle should the panels be installed at, who should you trust to put them up there and the big question as to whether it’s even viable to get solar at all.

But even after you’ve sorted that all out, the question of sizing is still up for debate, and whether bigger is indeed better. To help you narrow down what you should be looking for, Canstar Blue explores 500 watt solar panels, and if they’re the best fit for your needs.


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How big is a 500 watt solar panel?

A 500W solar panel has an output of – you guessed it – 500 watts, with most residential solar panels sitting at around 370 watts. As a result, 500 watt solar panels have a bigger output, and are physically bigger than residential solar panels, with dimensions roughly around 2.4×1.2m, compared to the average size of 1.5x1m of residential solar panels.

Due to their size – both physical and output – 500W solar panels are primarily made for commercial needs, or for those who at the very least have plenty of roof space. If you’re looking to get solar on your commercial property, check out our guide on commercial solar power to find out what else you’ll need to consider.

How much can a 500 watt solar panel produce?

Rows of solar panels

Ideally, a 500W solar panel can produce up to 500 watts, but doesn’t always do so, as how much a solar panel can produce is dependent on several factors, including how much sun it’s exposed to. As a general rule of thumb though, a 500 watt solar panel can produce between 3-4kWh of power per day, which can power multiple household appliances, and save you a bit of money on your energy bill.

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Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on the Ausgrid network in Sydney but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 3900kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. These are products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on the Citipower network in Melbourne but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 4000kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. These are products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on the Energex network in Brisbane but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 4600kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. These are products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on SA Power network in Adelaide but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 4000kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. These are products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Where can I buy a 500 watt Solar Panel?

At the time of writing, only two brands offer 500W solar panels in Australia, including Trina Solar and Jinka Solar, with final costs dependent on a number of factors. As relatively new innovations in the solar market, and made primarily for the smaller commercial market, 500 watt solar panels are a bit more niche than traditional residential solar panels, meaning there isn’t a wide variety of options available.

Is a 500 watt solar panel worth buying?

Man installing solar panels

The size of your solar panels can be a crucial part in how effective your system is, and how much you can save on your energy bill, but whether a 500W panel is the best fit for you is entirely down to your circumstances. If you have a smaller roof, or a roof that only gets a finite amount of sunlight, a 500 watt solar panel may not be the best purchase, but if you have a larger residential or commercial property that’s looking to turn green, then a 500W may be worth exploring further.

Given that solar is already a big investment, it’s a good idea to set aside some time to do some research before installing. This way you’ll know where you stand in terms of price and if there are any potential issues. Get started by clicking the link below.

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Picture credit: Thinnapob Proongsak/shutterstock.com, Terelyuk/shutterstock.com, Elena Elisseeva/shutterstock.com

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