Solar feed-in tariff changes in Australia

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If you’re like most Australians who installed a solar energy system, you did so with the aim of reducing your electricity bills. The solar feed-in tariff (FiT) you receive from your energy provider is key to achieving that aim. But FiTs fluctuate and keeping track of those changes wasn’t easy – until now.

This page shows changes to solar feed-in tariffs from energy providers on Canstar Blue’s database. If a provider decreases or increases the feed-in tariff on its electricity plans, you’ll find the information you need right here.

Our aim is to provide a valuable resource for solar customers in Australia that reports on the average feed-in tariff movements from energy providers over a specific observation period.

You can skip ahead to see the changes to certain feed-in tariffs via the links below, and don’t forget to check out some solar-specific deals in your state or territory a little further down.

Compare Solar Deals

Most electricity plans on the market will provide a feed-in tariff for solar customers, even if it’s nothing to get excited about. But some energy retailers offer deals that are specifically marketed towards customers with solar panels that often include a higher feed-in tariff than what’s available with retailers’ other offers.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on the Ausgrid network in Sydney but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 3900kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. These are products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on the Citipower network in Melbourne but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 4000kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. These are products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on the Energex network in Brisbane but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 4600kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. These are products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Here are some of the cheapest solar-specific deals from the retailers on our database. These costs are based on SA Power network in Adelaide but prices will vary depending on your circumstances. We show one product per retailer, listed in order of lowest price first. Annual price estimates assume general energy usage of 4000kWh/year for a residential customer on a single rate tariff. Price estimates exclude solar feed-in tariff credits. These are products from referral partners†. Our database may not cover all deals in your area, and please check retailer websites for up to date information.

Solar feed-in tariff changes by state and territory

The tables below show changes to average solar feed-in tariffs over a specific observation period (1 January 2021 to 19 October 2021). These figures reflect changes to FiTs on single rate tariff plans only, according to Canstar Blue’s database. Check out each state or territory for a full summary and remember that not all customers will be impacted by these changes. Contact your energy retailer for further information.

Feed-In Tariff Changes NSW

Electricity Distributor Average FiT
(Jan 2021)
Average FiT
(Oct 2021)
Change
Ausgrid 8.9c 7.1c -1.8c
Endeavour Energy 8.9c 7.1c -1.8c
Essential Energy 9c 7.2c -1.8c

Based on single rate electricity plans with a solar feed-in tariff on Canstar Blue’s database. Accurate as of October 2021.

The average solar feed-in tariff rate has dropped slightly in New South Wales by 1.8c/kWh . The minimum FiT across Sydney and the rest of NSW is at 3c/kWh, while the highest is 40c/kWh (conditions apply). Check out a list of solar FiTs in NSW via the link below.

Feed-In Tariff Changes VIC

Electricity Distributor Average FiT
(Jan 2021)
Average FiT
(Oct 2021)
Change
Citipower 10.8c 7.6c -3.3c
Jemena 10.9c 7.7c -3.2c
Powercor 11c 7.6c -3.4c
Ausnet Services 10.9c 7.6c -3.3c
United Energy 11c 7.6c -3.4c

Based on single rate electricity plans with a solar feed-in tariff on Canstar Blue’s database. Accurate as of October 2021.

The average solar feed-in tariff rate has fallen by roughly 3.3c/kWh across Victoria, and now sits at about 7.6c/kWh – only slightly above the state minimum for single-rate tariff plans at 6.7c/kWh. The highest FiT in VIC is currently 12c/kWh (conditions apply). See what solar FiTs are available by following the link below.

Feed-In Tariff Changes QLD

Electricity Distributor Average FiT
(Jan 2021)
Average FiT
(Oct 2021)
Change
Energex 8.5c 6.8c -1.7c
Ergon Energy* 7.9c 6.6c -1.3c

Based on single rate electricity plans with a solar feed-in tariff on Canstar Blue’s database. *Ergon Energy is the only electricity provider in this region. Accurate as of October 2021.

Sunny Queensland fared pretty well, even though the average solar feed-in tariff has dropped by 1.7c/kWh, and now sits at 6.8c/kWh across the Energex network. Customers in regional QLD experienced a 1.3c/kWh decline to the default FiT rate set by Ergon Energy. See which other rates are available across the Sunshine State by clicking on the link below.

Feed-In Tariff Changes SA

Electricity Distributor Average FiT
(Jan 2021)
Average FiT
(Oct 2021)
Change
SA Power Networks 10.1c 6.5c -3.6c

Based on single rate electricity plans with a solar feed-in tariff on Canstar Blue’s database. Accurate as of October 2021.

Solar customers in South Australia saw a 3.6c/kWh decrease to the average feed-in tariff, which now sits at around 6.5c/kWh. There’s a huge difference between the lowest and highest FiTs in SA right now, which is why it’s good to compare a range of options from retailers by clicking on the link below.

Feed-In Tariff Changes TAS

Electricity Distributor Average FiT
(Jan 2021)
Average FiT
(Oct 2021)
Change
TasNetworks 13.7c 7.1c -6.6c

Based on single rate electricity plans with a solar feed-in tariff on Canstar Blue’s database. Accurate as of October 2021.

Tasmania reported the most drastic average feed-in tariff drop of 6.6c/kWh, which crashed from 13.7c/kWh in January 2021 to 7.1c/kWh in October 2021. The current minimum solar FiT in Tassie is 6.501c/kWh, however some energy retailers are offering rates as high as 10c/kWh.

Feed-In Tariff Changes ACT

Electricity Distributor Average FiT
(Jan 2021)
Average FiT
(Oct 2021)
Change
Evoenergy 9.3c 7.7c -1.5c

Based on single rate electricity plans with a solar feed-in tariff on Canstar Blue’s database. Accurate as of October 2021.

The nation’s capital managed to report one of the lowest decreases to the average solar feed-in tariff, shifting from 9.3c/kWh to 7.7c/kWh – a difference of 1.5c/kWh. There are FiTs in Canberra that are higher than the average right now so it’s worth checking them out via the link below.

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What is a solar feed-in tariff?

A solar feed-in tariff is the buyback rate a customer receives for feeding electricity generated by their solar system back into the grid in exchange for a rebate on their power bill. The size of the rebate will primarily depend on how much power is exported, in conjunction with. Solar customers are usually paid by their retailer in cents per kilowatt hour (kWh) for exporting electricity.

In the general scheme of things, feed-in tariffs are one of the biggest drivers for Aussies thinking about installing rooftop solar. That’s why it’s good to not only see what rates are being offered, but to also see how much they’ve changed over time.

Why do solar feed-in tariffs change?

Hand with money symbol and sunlight in background

Solar feed-in tariffs change for several reasons but are mainly driven by wholesale electricity prices – the rates energy retailers pay for power, which fluctuate depending on the time of day. Energy retailers can and do change the FiT rates on electricity plans quite frequently, with details normally outlined in the fine print.

As rooftop solar in Australia continues to rise in popularity, it creates a surplus of solar-generated power that’s delivered to the grid, usually at a time when electricity demand is low. This in turn drives wholesale prices  , with regulators and retailers alike adjusting FiT rates to reflect market conditions.

In some regions, solar FiTs are set or recommended by industry regulators, meaning there is a minimum rate or ballpark figure customers can expect, according to their tariff type. For example, Victoria currently has a minimum FiT rate for customers on a single-rate tariff, as well as a time-varying tariff.

How to find the best solar feed-in tariff

There’s no denying that feed-in tariffs are an important factor to think about for solar customers but that shouldn’t be the only consideration. A higher FiT rate won’t guarantee lower energy bills – in fact, it could prove to do the opposite. How so, you say? Well, a large feed-in tariff could be concealing inflated usage and supply rates – the two main charges on your bill.

That’s why it’s a good idea to check the energy fact sheets of any plan you consider to truly understand what fees and charges you’ll pau. This way you’ll be equipped to know what’s most suitable to your personal energy consumption needs, whether that’s a higher feed-in tariff or lower electricity rates.

Image credits: Marcel Rommens/Shutterstock.com, maradon 333/Shutterstock.com

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